Soup After School Starts Again!

Soup After SchoolThis time next week, Soup After School will have returned to Holy Trinity from its summer vacation! From 4-6pm on the First and Third Tuesdays of each month, you can come by Holy Trinity to enjoy a free meal of soup, bread and a beverage while visiting with your neighbors. The Church of the Holy Trinity, along with our partners from the Cathedral of St. James host Soup After School from September through May, and all are welcome!

Soup After School Dates for the 2016-17 School Year:  Sept 6/20 • Oct 4/18 • Nov 1/15 • Dec 6/20 • Jan 3/17 • Feb 7/21 • Mar 7/21 • Apr 4/18 • May 2/16

The Multiplication of the Children

You’ve heard about Jesus multiplying the 5 loaves and 2 fish to feed the multitude? Well today at Holy Trinity, Jesus multiplied 5 girls and 2 boys into 22 children who feasted upon God’s love for them!

It happened like this:  our Diocesan Sr. High Mission Week is focusing on missional work around the diocese. Today the youth were visiting Holy Trinity to offer a one-day Vacation Bible School for the children of our neighborhood. The only problem was finding some children in the 4-12 age range for the high school kids to work with!

Last Thursday I went around putting leaflets on doors, but I only had time to cover 6 blocks. I came back on Monday afternoon to cover a few more blocks, but one never knows how many people those leaflets will reach. . .

Tuesday morning came along, and one girl came a bit early, then three more girls with their grandmother. Just as the Senior High youth arrived (delayed by road closings), two boys arrived with their mother. So now we had 10 youth, 7 adults, and only 7, really nervous kids to teach. Oh, and did I mention that I had only met 1 of the kids before today?IMG_1837

So that’s when the miracle started. We welcomed the kids we had, started telling them about Jesus and his love for them, shared some food and some stories, played some games. Somewhere along the way, more kids started arriving, and then some more (the noontime arrival of a Bonny Doon truck, driven by Adam Craroll, one of our parishioners, might have helped!). By the end, we had 22 children, plus several parents, gathered to hear about the love of God.

Hope is indeed a growing thing!

Live Webcast of the Consecration

Dear Friends in Christ Jesus in the Diocese of Northern Indiana,

The Consecration of the Eighth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana will be webcast live on Saturday, June 25th at 11:00 EDT.

To view the webcast, please visit the diocesan website at www.ednin.org/livestream. The service bulletin is available there for download.

The webcast will begin a few minutes before the liturgy begins to give you time in advance.

Blessings to you,
The Transition Committee

Ascension Day Service

Please Join the Episcopal and ELCA Congregations of Northern Indiana

for a Joint Eucharist in Celebration of

AscensionErspamer

The Feast of Our Lord’s

Ascension

at 6:30 pm

on Thursday, May 5

at the

Church of the Holy Trinity

915 N. Olive Street

South Bend, Indiana

Rev. Rudolph W. Mueller (ELCA) Preacher

Rev. Terri L. Bays (Episcopal) Celebrant

Reception to Follow

(parking available across Olive Street from the church)

“Where is Your Church?

Is it the one at the corner of Olive and Prast?”

The question took me by surprise, coming as it did from a staff member at the rehab. facility—way on the other side of town—where I was visiting one of our parishioners. The woman had been coming up the hallway down which Pat and I were making our slow and careful way. Fixing me with an intense stare, she crossed to our side of the hallway and presented her question. Swallowing my shock, I nodded towards Pat and stammered,

“Yes, we are at the Church of the Holy Trinity, at the corner of Olive and Prast.”

She nodded in satisfaction.

I thought so. I live just down the street from there, and I’ve seen you going around Aspergillumand blessing the neighborhood!

She then went on to tell me that the pastor of her neighborhood church was ill and asked me to pray for him. I took down his name and said I would both pray for him and put him on the parish prayer list.

From where she said she lived, I’m guessing that she saw us last September, when we went around on the feast of St. Michael and All Angels, blessing our neighbors and asking the angels to exercise God’s protection over them. In other words, even though it was seven months later and clear across town, this neighbor remembered us well enough to ask for our prayers.

Tomorrow is another opportunity to make such memories. It will be Tuesday in Rogation week, and for the third year in a row, we will be processing around, blessing the labor of our neighbors. This year’s focus will be on the corner of Bendix and Lincoln Way West. In order to preserve energy, we will meet up in the parking lot of Faith Apostolic Ministries () rather than at Holy Trinity. After blessing our fellow “laborers in the harvest,” we will cross Bendix and bless our way up the east side of the street, veering east onto Ardmore and blessing all the workplaces on the corners before heading south again on the west side of Bendix. On our way back, we will swing west to bless the LaSalle Library and the other businesses of LaSalle Square before getting in our cars to go to Holy Trinity, where we will bless the convenience store across the street and our Unity Garden before heading inside for Eucharist.

Unless it’s raining, in which case we will bless all the same businesses from inside the church!

Our blessings are another way of answering the question “where is your church?”.  Jesus calls us to be salt and light to the world, starting with that part of the world that bumps up against us. To be the church in a neighborhood is to extend God’s peace to that neighborhood.

You never know what an impression that might make.

Presiding Bishop Addresses Staff Regarding Investigation Findings

This morning, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry addressed the staff of The Episcopal Church Center (affectionately known as “815” after its street address in NYC). The occasion was the conclusion of an independent investigation into “formal complaints and allegations of potential violations of personnel policies of the DFMS” (Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society).  The investigation began on December 9, 2015 when the presiding bishop put Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer, Mr. Sam McDonald, Deputy Chief Operating Officer and Director of Mission, and Mr. Alex Baumgarten, Director of Public Engagement and Mission Communications on administrative leave.

I will refer you to the press release for details of the investigation’s findings and recommendations.  What particularly struck me about the address, and what I will comment on, is the connection our presiding bishop makes between the seemingly mundane topic of personnel policies and the somewhat more “spiritual” concept of mission. Curry asserts that:

Our task as staff is to serve The Episcopal Church in such a way that it can serve the world in the Name and in the Spirit of Jesus Christ. Our commitment to taking our place as part of the Jesus Movement in the world, our commitment to the work of evangelism, our commitment to the work of racial reconciliation is directly tied to this. And I am unswerving in my commitment to that.

This link between “infrastructure” and mission is an important one. It is easy to fall into the trap of considering our responsibilities to infrastructure—taking vestry minutes, paying bills, mowing the grass—as the collection of concerns that get in the way of mission.   What the presiding bishop is saying, however, is that the way we take care of these infrastructure concerns is a both reflects our faith and commitment to our neighbor and enables the expression of that faith and commitment.

As we at Holy Trinity strive to put our own house in order, we too are called to investigate the ways in which our infrastructure (or lack thereof) undermines our mission. Let us remember that the time, care and approach we take in examining our stewardship, keeping records, and mopping floors is as much a matter of mission as our outreach efforts are.